Southern New England Divisional Leaders

Majors Marzan

Major Jorge Marzán and Major Limaris Marzán
Email: Jorge.Marzan@use.salvationarmy.org
Limaris.Marzan@use.salvationarmy.org


Divisional Headquarters

Divisional Headquarters

855 Asylum Avenue
Hartford, CT 06105
(860) 702-0000
FacebookTwitter
Serving Connecticut and Rhode Island


Mission Statement

The Salvation Army, an international movement, is an evangelical part of the universal Christian church. Its message is based on the Bible. Its ministry is motivated by the love of God. Its mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and to meet human needs in His name without discrimination.


Doing The Most Good!

Whether it's embracing the homeless, uplifting the abused or abandoned, training and mentoring the disadvantaged, providing character building programs for youth, or assisting the displaced or elderly, The Salvation Army's goal remains the same: serving the most people, meeting the most needs, DOING THE MOST GOOD!


About Us

Salvation Army adult rehabilitation centers

  • Who: Whether it's embracing the homeless, uplifting the abused or abandoned, training and mentoring the disadvantaged, providing character building programs for youth, or assisting the displaced or elderly, The Salvation Army's goal remains the same: serving the most people, meeting the most needs, DOING THE MOST GOOD!

  • What: The Salvation Army exists to serve the people of Connecticut and Rhode Island in their time of need -- great or small. Each individual is addressed as a whole person with physical, emotional and spiritual needs. The Salvation Army aspires to assist individuals to become more independent through a variety of services and programs.

  • Where: Internationally, The Salvation Army serves in 127 countries. In Southern New England, there are 23 Corps/Citadel Community Centers and also volunteer-driven Service Units located in all other communities not served by the Corps/Citadel Community Centers throughout Connecticut and Rhode Island. Providing similar services, these units are an extension of the Army in places where a Corps Community Center is not located.

Locations Overview

The 23 Corps/Citadel Community Centers are located in: (Connecticut) Ansonia, Bridgeport, Bristol, Danbury, Hartford (four locations), Manchester, Meriden, Middletown, New Britain, New Haven, New London, Norwalk, Norwich, Stamford, Torrington, Waterbury,  and Willimantic; and in (Rhode Island) Newport, Pawtucket and Providence. There are some centers that have two distinct worship programs -- one in English and one in Spanish.

Volunteer-driven Service Units are located in all other communities throughout the two states. These units are an extension of the Army in places where a community center building is not located, with the exception of Winsted, where a Service Center provides food pantry, afterschool services and other programs. Service Unit volunteers can provide assistance to help people with utility and rental assistance, car repair, medical needs, and other unique services. Working in cooperation with other local agencies, a Service Unit serves to keep people in need from "falling between the cracks".


Common Symbols

People often wonder what some of the symbols of The Salvation Army mean. Many of these symbols date back to when William Booth renamed his organization, East London Christian Mission, to The Salvation Army. With the name change in 1878, many more Salvationists began using military phrases. Uniforms, flags, and brass bands began to appear, and by October 1878, the first volume of Orders and Regulations for The Salvation Army was required reading for Salvationists. There are two identifiable logos that we use, and several very distinctive outward "trademarks" you might see:

ShieldThe Salvation Army Shield is the "community service" logo of the Army. It was used to symbolize the human services work of our organization, which began in 1896. The origin of the shape seems to indicate that the shield is an enlargement of the type worn in earlier days by Salvationists, mostly women, to join their collar. "The message of the shield . . . tells of a fight on a spiritual battlefield which must last as long as life itself, and that God in Christ is a shield to protect and save us to the uttermost."

CrestThe Salvation Army Crest is the ecclesiastical logo of the Army. It is a worldwide symbol of Christian compassion and service, first appearing in 1879 and symbolizing the Army's doctrines. The meaning: the cross of the Lord Jesus Christ, the "S" for Salvation from sin through Jesus, the ray on the outside of the circle being the Fire of the Holy Spirit, The dots the Truth of the Gospel, the swords for Spiritual Warfare, and "Blood and Fire" being The Blood that was shed by Jesus for our sins and the Fire of the Holy Spirit

UniformThe Salvation Army Uniform. Identifies the wearer as a member of a worldwide evangelical movement, and is a silent witness to the fact that the wearer is a Christian. It also symbolizes availability to those in need. The 'S' insignias for 'Salvation' on the uniform indicate different rank and position in the organization -- blue worn by local laity and soldiers and red/maroon worn by ordained ministers with varying degrees of rank from Lieutenants to General.

FlagThe Salvation Army Flag. The blue symbolizes purity of God, red represents the blood of Jesus Christ, yellow is the fire of the Holy Spirit, "Blood and Fire" stands for the blood Jesus shed and the purifying power of the Holy Spirit, and the Star represents fire of the Holy Spirit. The flag is international with the words, "Blood and Fire" appearing in the language of each nation.